Face Recognition + Mandatory Police Body Cameras = Mass Surveillance?

Facial recognition software is already in use, and it has privacy advocates worried. An anonymous reader quotes the Bay Area Newsgroup.
Southern California-based FaceFirst sells its facial recognition technology to retail stores, which use it to identify shoplifters who have been banned from the store, and alert management if they return. Corporate offices and banks also use the software to recognize people who are wanted by police… Several local law enforcement agencies have expressed interest in the technology, but so far none have had the budget for it. FaceFirst sells software police officers can install on their smartphones and use to identify people in the field from up to 12 feet away.

Some privacy experts worry facial recognition technology will show up next in police body cameras, with potentially dangerous consequences… The problem, say privacy advocates, is that all kinds of people come into contact with police, including many who are never suspected of any crimes. So lots of innocent people could be caught up in a police database fed by face-recognizing body cameras. The body cameras could turn into a “massive mobile surveillance network,” said Jeramie Scott, national security counsel for the Electronic Privacy Information Center.
One-third of America’s police departments use body cameras. (And just in San Jose, there’s already 450 neighborhood cameras that have also agreed to share their footage for police investigations.) The new technologies concern the ACLU’s policy director for technology and civil liberties. “You have very powerful systems being purchased, most often in secret, with little-to-no public debate and no process in place to make sure that there are policies in place to safeguard community members.”

Source: www.slashdot.org

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