South Korea Finds Qualcomm Prevented Samsung From Selling Its Exynos Processors

According to the South Korea Trade Commission (SKTC), Qualcomm prevented Samsung from selling its Exynos processors to various third-party phone manufacturers. “The Commission’s report claims that Qualcomm abused its standard-essential patents — which define technical standards like Wi-Fi and 4G — to prevent Samsung from selling its modems, integrated processors, and other chips to smartphone makers like LG, Huawei, Xiaomi, and others,” reports Digital Trends. “The Commission reportedly threatened to file suit against Samsung, which had agreed to license the patents for an undisclosed sum, if the South Korean electronics maker began competing against it in the mobile market.” From the report: That bullying ran afoul of the South Korea Trade Commission’s rules, which require that standard-essential patents be licensed on fair, reasonable, and non-discriminatory (FRAND) terms. “Samsung Electronics has been blocked from selling its modem chips to other smartphone manufacturers due to a license deal it signed with Qualcomm,” the commissioners wrote. The report provides legal justification for the $853 million fine the SKTC placed on Qualcomm in December for “anti-competitive practices.” Qualcomm intends to appeal. “[We] strongly disagree with the KFTC’s announced decision, which Qualcomm believes is inconsistent with the facts and the law, reflects a flawed process, and represents a violation of due process rights owed American companies” under an applicable agreement between the U.S. and South Korea.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Source: www.slashdot.org

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