IBM gives cancer-killing drug AI project to the open source community

IBM has released three artificial intelligence (AI) projects tailored to take on the challenge of curing cancer to the open-source community. At the 18th European Conference on Computational Biology (ECCB) and the 27th Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology (ISMB), which will be held in Switzerland later this month, the tech giant will dive into how each of the projects can advance our understanding of cancers and their treatment. …

July 22, 2019
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Another NASA moonshot? Nope. You can’t BS your way to space

On July 20, 1969, I was at a science camp in Butcher Bend, WV. I watched Neil Armstrong take his first steps on the moon on a 19″ black-and-white TV.  Later, I stepped outside and looked up at the moon and marveled that we were there. It was a miracle of science, engineering, and — never forget — government finance. Could we do it today? No. We, the United States,…

July 19, 2019
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IDG Contributor Network: Life after artificial intelligence

What will we invent after we invent everything that can be invented? Artificial intelligence stands to be the most radically transformative technology ever developed by the human race. As a former artificial intelligence entrepreneur turned investor, I spend a lot of time thinking about the future of this technology: where it’s taking us and how our lives are going to reform around it. We humans tend to develop emergent technologies…

July 18, 2019
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São Paulo subway to deploy surveillance system with facial recognition

The Brazilian city of São Paulo will see facial recognition technology applied to the surveillance systems of its subway network. The company operating the majority of the city’s subway network, Companhia do Metropolitano de São Paulo (METRO), has launched a tender for a new set-up to replace its current legacy system and a non-integrated estate of 2200 cameras, of which only some are digital. Under the new contract, the old…

July 17, 2019
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To the Moon: Grumman, the company that built Apollo 11’s Lunar Module

The Apollo Lunar Module (LEM) built by Grumman. This article was originally published in July of 2009. The Apollo Lunar Module, or “LEM” for short, was a highly specialized spacecraft built by Grumman Aircraft Engineering which was designed to land on the lunar surface and return the astronauts to the Command Module in lunar orbit for their trip back to Earth.  Once it became clear that America was going to…

July 17, 2019
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To the Moon: Rocketdyne, the company that gave Apollo 11 liftoff

This article was initially published in July of 2009. Early in 1960, the Apollo program was conceived by the Eisenhower administration as a direct sequel to the Mercury program, the United States’s first manned space program. Much of the US’s backing of the manned space program was rhetoric until Russian Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin aboard his Vostok 1 spacecraft made history with the world’s first orbital crewed flight in April of…

July 17, 2019
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To the Moon: IBM and Univac, Apollo 11’s integrators

This article was initially written in 2009. IBM’s Real-Time Computer Complex in Houston (Top) and NASA’s Fresnedillas DSTN station in Madrid, Spain, (Bottom) one of the many Deep Space Tracking Network outposts using UNIVAC systems for pre-processing of telemetry downlink and command uplink data. Sending men to the Moon was not just about building gigantic Saturn V rockets and shooting them off into space. While it was the critical component…

July 17, 2019
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To the Moon: Boeing, the builder of the mighty Saturn V Apollo rocket

This article was originally written in July of 2009. The Saturn V rockets, standing 363 feet tall, were the most powerful launch vehicles ever built by the United States, and the most powerful in the world ever brought into operational status. They were comprised of hundreds of thousands of parts and weighed in at nearly 6.7 million pounds when fully loaded with liquid oxygen/hydrogen (LOX/LH2) and liquid kerosene (RP-1) propellants….

July 17, 2019
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To the Moon: 50 years after Apollo 11, is SpaceX the new NASA?

This article was originally written in July of 2009. Ten years ago, on the fortieth anniversary of the Apollo 11 landing, I wrote a series of articles titled “To the Moon: How we Built the Technologies.” In it, I profiled the key companies that contributed to the space program to make the moon missions a reality. As part of those articles, I also talked a bit about where those companies are now…

July 17, 2019
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50 years after Apollo 11: What really rocketed us to the moon

Our commitment to space exploration began with a wake-up call over six decades ago with a beeping sound. Not with a clock radio, but with a transponder signal that could be tuned into by any ham radio enthusiast — the launching and ever present chirping of the Soviet Sputnik 1 satellite in 1957, the first artificial satellite. Shortly after that, the Soviets sent a dog into space aboard Sputnik 2….

July 17, 2019
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